Home to Fascinating Myanmar
   
 
The site will contain tons of information on its people, its beautiful tourist destinations, where to go and eat, which supermarkets offer the best prices and so on.  
    Traditions & Lifestyles / Lifestyles and Activities /   Advertisements
 

Birthdays

  According to Myanmar traditional astronomy, there are eight days in a week as opposed to seven days in the internationally accepted calendar. In the Myanmar calendar, the eighth day is added in the middle of the week where 'Wednesday evening' is named "Yahu". However, Yahu is not considered as a significant day of week and thus not included on many official calendars.

Corners per Day of Week


Because the pagodas in Theravada Buddhism are cone-shaped, they form a circle at the base. But the platform of a pagoda is nominally set apart into eight directions, as if it were octagonal, with each direction dedicated to each day of the week as mentioned above.


Signs per Day of the Week

Signs Day of Week

Signs

Day of Week

Galone

Sunday

Tiger

Monday

Lion

Tuesday

Elephant without a tusk

Wednesday _morning and afternoon

Elephant with a tusk

Wednesday _ evening

Mouse

Thursday

Guinea pig

Friday

Dragon

Saturday


Numerical Values per Day of the Week

It may sound strange to learn that there are numerical values for days of the week in addition to signs. The value starts with one for Sunday and increments each day.

Value Day of Week Myanmar Day of Week

Value

Day of Week

Myanmar day of week

1.

Sunday

Ta_nin_ga_nway

2.

Monday

Ta_nin_lar

3.

Tuesday

In_gar

4.

Wednesday (morning_and afternoon)

Bote_da_hoo

5.

Wednesday_evening

Ya_hu

6.

Thursday

Kyar_thar_pa_day

7.

Friday

Thauk_kyar

8.

Saturday

Sa_nay


Zar Tar (Myanmar Astrology)


Zartar is a type of record keeping of salient facts about persons at the time of their birth. It includes such things as the date and time of delivery, the astrological features at that time, the names of the parents and the name for that person given by the astrologer. The term 'Zartar' is derived from the Pali word 'Zati', which means "birth."

But zartar is also applied in documenting certain important events and in setting out specifications of buildings and structures. A zartar is usually made of palm leaf, on which the astrological readings are inscribed or etched with a stylus. After that, the whole piece is rubbed lightly with crude oil, which makes the material insect-proof while giving it a beautiful golden hue with the words standing out in contrast. It can also be made of other materials such as ivory, marble or bamboo depending on the choice of the user. In the National Museum in Yangon has a zartar made of gold, marking the coronation of King Mindon.

Zartar used to play an important role in a person's life as Myanmar people believe the timing, day, date and astronomical signs associated with a person at birth have great influence on the life of that person. For example, each day of the week is designated with a symbolic animal and a person born on a particular day tends to possess certain characteristics: Sunday-borns are usually vain; Monday-borns make ready money; and Tuesday-borns have sweet disposition. Moreover, the names of persons born on a particular day may have some similarity in bearing one of a group of letters from the alphabet.

Finally, there are seven birth signs included in the zartar depending on the day and year of birth, which are believed to have influence on one's fate. They are: Adhipadhi, sign of fame; Ahtun, sign of brilliance; Thike, sign of wealth; Raza, sign of glory; Marana, sign of weakness; Bingha, sign of unrest, and Puti, sign of failure.